Monday, September 14, 2015

10 Class Rules for the Teacher



I read an article for teachers on edutopia.org this past weekend called, 13 Common Sayings to Avoid.  It gave a run-down of some things teachers say to their students and makes me wonder why those teachers chose this profession in the first place. Teachers, by far, set the tone in a classroom and school. By using phrases such as, “You need to try harder.”, “What’s wrong with you?” and “Why can’t you listen to instructions?”, an air of disrespect, resentment and a drop in student motivation can occur. So, I thought it could be helpful to post a list of classroom rules for teachers instead of the students. Why not? Sometimes adults need reminders about their behavior as well! Here a few not-so-serious (but, they could be serious) rules teachers can follow:


1. Use an “indoor voice” when speaking to the class. Yelling, shouting and screaming inside
is best used when watching your favorite football team play a game on tv.

2. Be kind to others. Use “Please” and “Thank-you” often. Be courteous and model kindness.

3. Walk in the Classroom. Move around and help kids with their work, monitor behavior or answer a question. Be available and mobile.

4. Be a good listener. Listen to your students. Listen if a student tells you he/she is being bullied, doesn’t understand, is having a bad day, or didn’t eat breakfast.

5. Clean up after yourself. Keep clutter and dirt to a minimum. Allow students spaces to move freely and safely. 

6. Come to class prepared. Have your lesson plans for the day done, materials prepared and resources ready.

7. Follow instructions. Refer to the IEP, remember the request to call a parent after school, follow through with staff responsibilities. 

8. Stay on task. Teach not text, mark homework, give students one-to-one support or prepare for the next lesson.

9. Hand in work on time. Mark your student’s assignments in a timely fashion and hand them back within a week or two of the due date! Kids learn through their mistakes. By providing students with immediate feedback, they are more likely to retain the information.

10. Do your best. Seek the advice from your seasoned colleagues, look for resources, collaborate and never stop learning how to be the best teacher you can be!

2 comments:

  1. I really like number 9! As a student I hated when teachers took two months to grade papers and return them. Thankfully the majority of my teachers during my academic career followed this rule.

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